Scene on the Strait

The art festival that helps kids and the environment

Tag: CREEC

Scene on the Strait 2016: All the facts you need to know

Scene on the Strait is one of the best art festivals in the Bay Area and California, showcasing the work of some of the finest plein air or landscape painters anywhere. About 20 artists will be at the festival to chat with people in a relaxed, friendly and informal atmosphere.

We welcome you to join us at the event, and here’s what you need to know when you come:

WHEN: Saturday, Aug. 13, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

WHERE: Martinez Regional Shoreline, Martinez. It’s a beautiful parkland setting on the shores of the Carquinez Strait.

DIRECTIONS: If you’re coming from the south (Walnut Creek area), take I-680 to Martinez and the Marina Vista exit. Turn left on Marina Vista and follow it to Ferry Street in downtown Martinez. Turn right on Ferry Street into Martinez Regional Shoreline and watch for our signs. If you’re coming from the north (Benicia area), take the Marina Vista exit and follow the same directions to the shoreline.

ADMISSION: Free

PARKING: Free

"Dancer," by Robert Sandige, this year's signature painting for Scene on the Strait.

“Dancer,” by Robert Sandige, this year’s signature painting for Scene on the Strait.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS WHO ARE PLANNING TO BE ON SITE THAT DAY: Rolando Barrero, Loralee Chapleau, David Casterson, Catherine Erickson, Mary Fassbinder, Philippe Gandiol, Jack Garasky, Geri Keary, Susan Kendall, Micaela Marsden, Chris Newhard, Teresa Onoda, Sandy Ostrau, Nancy Roberts, Wendy Rogers, Robert Sandidge, Joanne Uomini, Gregory Vasgerdsian, and Norma Webb.

ARTISTS WHO CANNOT BE THERE IN PERSON BUT WHO WILL BE SHOWING THEIR WORK: Mary Lou Correia, Kevin Courter and Mamie Walters.

SPECIAL FEATURES: In addition to the presence of the artists themselves, some will be painting on site and there may be a live model for them to paint. Special auctions offer fantastic prices on art. There will also be a special section devoted to “miniatures”—paintings that are no bigger than 64-inches square. All the artists listed above, including those who will not be there in person, will be showing their miniatures. These can sometimes be purchased for excellent prices too.

FOOD AND DRINKS: Yes! A Mexican food truck will be on hand. Bottled water and soft drinks will be sold. There will be no beer or wine sold at the event. Live music will be provided by the popular audience favorite, One Mile Band.

A WORD ABOUT THE WEATHER: It’s usually sunny and warm on the day of the event, so wear a hat and dress in light summer clothing. There are tent canopies that provide shade and many shade trees in the area, and plenty of benches and places to sit. It’s a comfortable place to stroll, look at art, and talk to people.

A scene from a past Scene on the Strait.

A scene from a past Scene on the Strait.

OUR MISSION: The sale of paintings at Scene on the Strait supports the Carquinez Regional Environmental Education Center (CREEC), a nonprofit environmental group that employs underserved young people to work at its greenhouse in Crockett and restore habitat and raise Monarch butterflies for release into the Carquinez Strait area. Since the first Scene on the Strait in 1996, hundreds of thousands of dollars have been raised to help these young people and to help butterflies flourish again in what was once a huge butterfly area. Art purchases are partly tax deductible.

FACEBOOK: For more information on Scene on the Strait, please visit us on Facebook. Click here to go to this page and see more pictures and learn more about the participating artists.

A HUGE THANK YOU: Many thanks to our sponsors: Shell Oil and C&H Sugar Crockett. Without their generous contributions, Scene on the Strait would not be possible.

ANOTHER HUGE THANK YOU: To our incredible volunteers. Our volunteers make all of this possible.

GUARANTEED: A good time. Come on out Aug. 13 and support the arts and the environment in a gorgeous parkland setting near the water.

Scene on the Strait art festival Aug. 13 in Martinez

reliableairstreamThe 20th annual Scene on the Strait, the art festival that helps kids help the environment, will take place Saturday, August 13, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the beautiful Martinez Regional Shoreline in Martinez, Calif.

Begun in 1995, Scene on the Strait is a benefit for the Carquinez Regional Environmental Education Center (CREEC), which employs underserved teens and young people to work at a nursery and restore endangered Monarch butterfly habitat along the Carquinez Strait.fp09

Over the years Scene on the Strait has become a premiere Northern California showcase for plein air art, featuring some of the best landscape painters in the state. The 2016 roster of artists includes:

Rolando Barrero, Nikki Basch-Davis, Loralee Chapleau, David Casterson, Mary Lou Correia, Kevin Courter, Suzanne D’Arcy, Catherine Erickson, Mary Fassbinder, Philippe Gandiol, Jack Garasky, Geri Keary, Susan Kendall, Micaela Marsden, Chris Newhard, Teresa Onoda, Sandy Ostrau, Nancy Roberts, Wendy Rogers, Robert Sandidge, Joanne Uomini, Gregory Vasgerdsian, Mamie Walters and Norma Webb.

There will be auctions and a special sale of miniature paintings. The One Mile Band will play music favorites, and a food truck will offer authentic Mexican food. Youths from CREEC will display and have for sale some of the native California plants they grow at the Crockett nursery.

The sale of art at Scene on the Strait has raised tens of thousand of dollars for CREEC and helped provide the funds for the first paychecks some of these boys and girls have ever earned. Art purchases are partly tax deductible.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAScene on the Strait is made possible with the help of our incredible volunteers and sponsors: C&H Sugar Crockett, Shell Oil, Conoco Phillips, Allied Waste Services, Southern Wine & Spirits, Contra Costa Newspapers, CMCS/Central Valley Party and the One Mile Band.

Parking and admission are free. Martinez Regional Shoreline is on Ferry Street in Martinez. See Scene on the Strait’s Facebook page or SceneOnTheStrait.org for more.

Working together: Kids, CREEC and Scene on the Strait

Scene on the Strait is the art festival that helps kids help the environment. The kids work for CREEC—Carquinez Regional Environmental Education Center—learning work skills and work habits while doing planting and other jobs at the CREEC greenhouse in Crockett. The work they do includes growing milkweed, which is a native California plant that Monarch butterflies love. By cultivating and later planting the milkweed along the Carquinez Strait, one of CREEC’s goals is to encourage the return of butterflies to the area.

The proceeds of Scene on the Strait go to support these kids, who are mainly teenagers, and help them learn valuable pre-employment job skills. Everybody wins, including the butterflies, because of the work of these kids. Here are some recent pictures of scenes around the CREEC greenhouse:

Raking out the weeds along one side of the CREEC greenhouse.

Raking out the weeds along one side of the CREEC greenhouse.

One of the jobs the kids do is weeding the pots so the milkweed and other plants will grow better.

One of the jobs the kids do is weeding the pots so the milkweed and other plants will grow better.

Trees and plants inside the greenhouse.

Trees and plants inside the greenhouse.

A piece of milkweed that Monarch butterflies adore.

A piece of milkweed that Monarch butterflies adore.

Scene on the Strait art festival returns Aug. 8: Meet the artists, help save butterflies

Scene on the Strait, an art festival that gives a lift to both young people and the environment, will take place Saturday, August 8, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Martinez Regional Shoreline in Martinez, Calif.

The 19th annual festival, one of the most popular events on the Northern California art calendar, is a premiere showcase for landscape or “plein air” painting. Some of the best-known plein air artists in California (including Jerry Turner, pictured below at left, at last year’s event) show their work and talk to art lovers from around the state.

Jerry Turner

Scene on the Strait is the chief fundraising event for the Carquinez Regional Environmental Education Center (CREEC), a nonprofit organization founded in 1995 whose mission is to restore butterfly habitat along the Carquinez Strait. The sale of art at the festival has raised tens of thousands of dollars over the years, enabling CREEC to employ disadvantaged youths to restore natural habit along the Carquinez Strait and release countless Monarch butterflies into the wild.

Last year’s Scene attracted hundreds of art lovers whose art purchases helped fund CREEC’s nature programs. Many of the artists who show their work also attend the event, chatting with people and perhaps even giving demonstrations of their painting techniques. Live music and gourmet food are always part of the event, as are special auctions and a display and sale of unique “miniature” paintings that are a hit with both the artists and art patrons.

Among the artists participating in this year’s event are: Rolando Barrero, Loralee Chapleau, Suzanne D’Arcy, Erin Dertner, Don Eagling, Catherine Erickson, Mary Fassbinder, John Finger, Jack Garasky, Geri Keary, Micaela Marsden, Chris Newhard, Teresa Onoda, Nancy Roberts, Wendy Rogers, Robert Sandidge, Tom Taneyhill, Gregory Vangerdsian and Norma Webb.

Parking and admission are free. Martinez Regional Shoreline is on Ferry Street in Martinez. Please visit Scene on the Strait’s Facebook page for more news and information.

Scenes from the 2011 Scene on the Strait

Please enjoy these scenes from the 2011 Scene on the Strait. We’re looking forward to creating similar scenes at this year’s event on August 9 in Martinez.

An art patron buys a painting from Scene on the Strait Volunteer Pat Hicks.

Painter Mamie Walters.

Another painter that year was Sandra Lo, admired by a friend and a canine connoisseur of art. Continue reading

From 2010: Remembering Pam Glover’s Life and Work

The 2010 Scene on the Strait was dedicated to the memory of Pam Glover, a beloved painter and longtime Scene participant who died earlier that year. (Her painting, “Happy House,” is below.) As part of the event that year we asked several of her fellow artists and friends to share their memories of her. Here are some of those tributes, all from artists who appeared at Scene on the Strait that year.

Teresa Onoda: “Monday mornings at 8:30 either I would call her or Pam would call me with a “wakey, wakey.” We’d say, “Do you want to paint today, any idea where, no, okay see you at let’s say half past 10.”  Every Monday for 15 years started that way.  We had many adventures. Most dirt roads within 60 miles in any direction were our playground. We talked on our way to the location and then not a word until it was time to go. We had a wonderful friendship and we had much in common-art, love of family and animals. We helped each other get through some rough times and laughed often. I miss my friend.”

Nikki Basch-Davis: “Pam had innocent sweetness and young-hearted humor. What I liked to do most was make her laugh. I can still close my eyes and hear her.”

Jerrold Turner: “Pam was an important teacher who launched so many artists on their careers. She brought the energy and passion of the “Society of Six” to the present day through the mentoring of Lou and Lundy Siegriest. She set an example that dedication, perseverance and the love of art are what are needed to succeed in life. And oh yeah, love of life.”

Ramona Kennon: “I was painting near Lake Tahoe 12 or 15 years ago when an older woman and her companion strolled through the site. Several of the artists I was painting with began to murmur, so I asked what the hubbub was about. “That’s Pam Glover” was the response. I returned to my painting hoping she would still be there when I finished, and I was engrossed in my work when a voice with a slight accent asked me, ‘What galleries are you in?’ ‘None,’ I replied as I turned to see the voice, which belonged to Pam.  “Well you will be,” she said, and moved on. This was my first meeting with Pam, and it was her confidence in my work that set me on the path to attain gallery representation which I obtained shortly thereafter.”

Mamie Walters: “Pam Glover was an inspiration to me from the first time that I met her, many years ago. At that time, I was a woman who was feeling the effects of growing older. I thought about the future and wondered if I could manage the rigors of plein air painting. When I saw Pam out there painting, those concerns left me and I have always appreciated her for that. I always felt good being in her company.”

Leslie Wilson: “Pam was an extraordinary artist who was a tireless supporter of open space preservation. Her enthusiasm for the great outdoors shows through in her paintings and that is her gift to all of us.”

Bryan Taylor: “On our first meeting, Pam immediately struck me as a dignified woman wholly dedicated to her art. Thereafter, I rarely met a serious artist or dilettante in the Bay Area who wasn’t already knowledgeable of her work as well as her gifts as a teacher. Through decades of persistent dedication to her craft her influence was felt far and wide. She has left a great legacy through her work, posterity and students and her influence will be felt through the generations to come.”

Geri Keary: “I knew Pam for many years as an artist to admire. I loved her bright colors and unique style.”

Mary Lou Correia: “My friendship with Pam Glover spanned some twenty years. I met her at a Maxwell showing in San Francisco and was enchanted by her spontaneous color and unique style. I enrolled in her Wednesday class and I painted with her and in Jerry Turner’s class on Saturdays. I wanted to glean as much as I could. I carried many of her lessons with me when I taught my own classes. Sketching out an idea very quickly, for instance, not to render but to jot down an idea. Teresa Onoda and Pam and I had lunch several times during her illness. She complained mildly about medical decisions but continued to enjoy painting. She came to my early shows always and discussed the painting market. She always shared her knowledge and encouraged me. The last time I saw Pam was to bring her lunch and to spend some quality time and to give Anne Marie [Glover, her daughter, who was helping to care for her] a break. I prepared some yogurt and fruit for her. I drove to Orinda and couldn’t find her house. I called Pam and she directed me and she was standing in the garage waiting for me. She cut up the fruit and gave me chicken salad. She made lunch for me. We enjoyed reminiscing. She showed me some of her older paintings. I am glad for that time. I admired her drive, her passion. She was my mentor both as an artist and as a person who lived with integrity. She lived life fully.”

“Boating,” by Pam Glover

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